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Resourcing and How to Practice It

What is Resourcing?

Resourcing is a resilience skill that uses people, places, things, and ideas to help you feel better.

Resourcing can help you stay in your Resilient or “OK” zone. It can also help you get back into your Resilient or “OK” zone if you have been bumped out.

Resourcing uses things you like to help you feel better. These things are called resources.

Resources Can Be Things Like: 

    • Things you like about yourself like your hair, eyes, or sense of humor.
    • A happy memory.
    • A person that makes you happy or feel good.
    • A place that you like to go.
    • Your favorite animal or pet.
    • A special picture.
    • A favorite song.

It may be easier to have the resource there with you, but this isn’t always possible. When you cannot have the resource with you, thinking about it can be just as helpful. When you are using the skill of resourcing, pay attention to the details of your resource. This is called RESOURCE INTENSIFICATION.

 

Cartoon of a woman meditating, she is relaxed.If you have the resource with you, use your senses to pay attention to how the resource looks, smells, or feels. If it’s a picture of a person or place, pay attention to the details of the picture.

If you are thinking about your resource, imagine what it looks like, how it feels, what it smells like, what it sounds like, and how it makes you feel.

When you are using the skill of resourcing, try to pay attention to at least three details about your resource.

After you have spent some time thinking about your resource, try to notice parts of your body that feel calmer or even “okay.”

Pay attention to your breathing, heart rate and muscles. After thinking about your resource your breathing and heart rate may slow down, and your muscles may feel more relaxed.

Resourcing Practice:

Resourcing is the name of a skill that includes resources. Resources can be anything that helps a person to feel better. They can be a person, place, thing, idea or, anything else that helps them feel better.

Cartoon of a woman taking pictures with a camera.

Jack is telling Jill about how he learned to take pictures with his mom. Jill asks him questions about his mom and the things he likes about

Cartoon of a man holding camera gear, he is taking a picture.

taking pictures.

Jack says that he enjoys taking pictures with her outside and the time they spend together. He says she is funny and makes him laugh. Jack

smiles as he tells Jill about his mom.

Jack’s mom is a resource for him. Even when he is not with her, he can think of her and it can help him feel better.

Jack can practice resource intensification by trying to remember specific details about his mom.

 

Resourcing Practice Examples:

Think of one of your own resources. Remember, a resource can be anyone or anything that you find comforting (person, place, thing, idea, etc.). Add your answer in the space below.

Example: Someone might choose an old teddy bear as their favorite resource.

Resource intensification: What are some details about your resource?

Example: The teddy bear might be big, soft, fuzzy, and light brown with black eyes.

What are some places in your body that feel comfortable or “okay” while you think of your resource?

Example: Shoulders and chest may start to relax.

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Other downloads

Name Description Type File
What is Resourcing? Resourcing is a resilience skill that uses people, places, things, and ideas to help you feel better. pdf Download file: What is Resourcing?
Resourcing Practice Resourcing is the name of a skill that includes resources. Resources can be anything that helps a person to feel better. They can be a person, place, thing, idea or, anything else that helps them feel better. pdf Download file: Resourcing Practice

This information was developed by the Autism Services, Education, Resources, and Training Collaborative (ASERT). For more information, please contact ASERT at 877-231-4244 or info@PAautism.org. ASERT is funded by the Bureau of Supports for Autism and Special Populations, PA Department of Human Services.